28 Feb 2018

Publication: Animals set the direction for Earth’s carbon cycle

In a new paper led by Richard Boyle, we show that the emergence of animal ecosystems – and more specifically the animal burrowing and sediment mixing – acted to dampen the magnitude and duration of instabilities in the Earth’s long term carbon cycle. The paper is published in Geobiology.  Read the Rich’s comment on the […]

28 Aug 2017

Why did it take so long before animals appeared on Earth?

One of the big mysteries in the history of life is why it took so long time for complex organisms to evolve. The Earth is 4.5 billion years old and fossils of the first motile animals are ca. 555 million years old. It took 3,945,000,000 years or almost 4 million millennia before evolution in mostly microbial ecosystems evolved organisms with a capacity to […]

30 May 2017

Lecture: Andy Knoll – Systems Paleobiology

The relationship between Earth and life through time How Systems Paleobiology uses physiology as the conceptual bridge between paleobiological and geochemical data sets and provides us with a template for understanding global climate change and evaluation of the habitability of other planets.  Professor Andrew H. Knoll, Fisher Professor of Natural History,Departments of Organismic and Evolutionary […]

7 Apr 2016

April 27, 2016: Tais speaks at the Symposium “From stones to bread” at the Royal Society of Denmark.

Can Greenlandic rock flour help mitigating climate change in the 21st century by enhancing global silicate weathering.  See program for the “From stones to bread” symposium at the Royal Society of Denmark.

15 Sep 2015

Tais speaks at the Stellar Astrophysics Center, Aarhus University

Nov 19: Tais speaks at the Stellar Astrophysics Center, Aarhus University